August 2011

The three are a portabella, a fish and a gyro taco. All good, but the portabella? Surprisingly good.

Portabella on left, gyro on right. Fish taco in the middle.

Our original review of this restaurant is here.

Teela Taqueria
227 Sandy Springs Place
Atlanta, GA 30328
(404) 459-0477

Teela Taqueria on Urbanspoon

Miso Izakaya was one of two high profile izakaya that opened in 2009, and of the two, had the longer gestation period into a critically regarded restaurant. It had been on my radar for some time, but my weekends had been dominated by Friday night maintenance issues, and I hadn’t been in condition to crawl the city on Saturdays until recently.  Finally, timing and circumstances allowed my family to get there, and I’m very glad the three of us went. It was a terrific place to take my family.

It’s about a mile further from Snellville than is Fox Brothers Barbecue, and the route, via Google Maps, is that nasty, difficult, winding through small roads Google Maps has anyone from Snellville do to get to Fox Brothers. About a mile further down DeKalb Avenue, you turn right at Krog, and then left on Edgewood. Miso ends up on your left.

Miso is smaller than I expected it to be, and has a smaller menu than I expected as well. Staff? Asian, but seemingly pretty multicultural. We arrived between 6 and 7 and I was dreading a 30 to 45 minute wait. Nothing of the sort happened. We were seated immediately. A crowd was developing as we left.

Miso's onigiri are terrific. After the first, we ordered a second.

Pickles (oshinko).

corn kariage was a pleasant surprise.

The menu fits on two side of a place mat, and is pretty versatile. Starters, salads, entrees, seafood dishes, tofu and vegetable dishes are some of the categories offered. We started with a wakame salad, edamame, onigiri, oshinko, and corn kariage, the closest thing we could find to traditional tempura.

wakame salad

Later we ordered an assortment of sushi.

Sushi. California roll and some nigiri.

Entrees included quail (excellent!), skirt steak, and tonkatsu. We later ordered a salmon skin salad, and fried oysters to end the meal.

Quail here are a fine dish.

Skirt steak

Tonkatsu. Smaller serving but very high quality.

Our waiter was excellent, the best staffer we’ve had in a while.

Impressions? Though the menu here is relatively small, it’s very creative, and Guy Wong’s interpretation of common dishes often yields unexpected surprises, things like salmon skin in the onigiri, green tea salt as a dipping spice, or the tiny circles of Thai pepper in the quail, perfectly sized to not overwhelm. There are small touches throughout the menu, and it has the feel of someone who tinkers and experiments with food. Dish names can be multicultural puns (i.e. green tomato katsu), and there is a playfulness that pervades the whole dining experience. To drag up a word that’s often overused in food blogging, Miso Izakaya is a lot of fun, and the joy of the unexpected small detail is going to be the engine that drives people to come here again and again.

Miso Izakaya
619 Edgewood Ave Southeast
Atlanta, GA 30312
(678) 701-0128

Miso Izakaya on Urbanspoon

Atlanta Things To Do on raveable

The origin of all omega-3s is the photosynthetic center of plants, the chloroplast.


Omega-3 fatty acids are synthesized as components of the cell membranes of chloroplasts, and no matter whether your chloroplasts come from here

Microalgae. Diatoms in this image.

or here..

Lemon grass, an example of a land based leafy plant.

adequate omega-3 fatty acids are easy to come by if you take a little care with your sources.

Steamed spinach. Popeye had the right idea.

Omega-6 fatty acids come from grains and nuts, such as these


and are concentrated in huge quantities in grain oils, such as corn oil, cottonseed oil, and canola oil.

Corn oil

Now, when one of these


eats large quantities of grass, they act as biological concentrators of those fatty acids. The butter from grass fed animals, in particular, is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. If, however, your meat sources eat large quantities of this


well, corn is a grain and those animals are going to be stuffed with omega-6 fatty acids. Animals, whether swimming or 4 legged, maintain high concentrations of the oils they eat.

In the absence of grass-fed land animals, sardines and herring are perhaps the cheapest, most available source of high quality omega-3 fatty acids, and cans of them can be purchased for perhaps 90 cents at the local supermarket.

A school of sardines.

Mackerel also works, as does trout or wild salmon.

Since omega-3 deficiencies in small children have been linked to learning issues, commercial manufacturers have moved into the gap.  These new products, however, have small servings of DHA at rather high prices ( 30 to 50 cents a pill), and tend to be given in pills along with a small scattering of vitamins (in pill form, a dose of vitamins costs about 5 cents each). Another common sleight of hand trick is to add a small amount of flax to a largely grain based cereal. Omega 6 from the cereal grains are going to overwhelm the small advantage gained by a tiny bit of flax seed.

Barleans, a respectable brand of flax seed oil. Whole Foods has a good store brand.

I have yet another suggestion. When possible, don’t feed your children lots of grains and lots of grain oils (or sardines soaked in cottonseed oil), but rather, perhaps get a little flax seed oil and cut up a bit of a really good tomato.

Japanese black trifele tomato, a good heirloom.

High quality Roma tomatoes can be had at the local market.

The flax seed oil will provide a very useful dose of plant based ALA, the oil will act as an excellent carrier for tomato lycopenes, and further, the conversion of this plant based omega-3 to EPA/DHA will be determined by the needs of the eater. I suspect it tastes better than a little pill, and per serving, feeds more than a pill.

If your young one is a plant hating carnivore, a little sardine or tuna mixed with a stretcher (perhaps a olive oil pesto) works.

Note: the vast majority of the images above come from Wikimedia Commons.

Joey D’s is a classic steakhouse, claiming components of Italian, Cajun, and New York steakhouse heritage. Inside, it’s very pretty with white shirted waiters everywhere, and plenty of metal, wood, and glass. Seating is fine, the restaurant is well lit. The ‘L’ shaped bar has shelves that extend 20 feet off the floor, full of liquor. Those of you that have seen the ladder routine at Leon’s Full Service in Decatur will be at home here.

I came in for lunch, looking for something I could have that wouldn’t bust a lunch budget. Steaks here are in the 20s, so they wouldn’t do. I settled for a filet mignon sandwich, some mussels and a salad.

The salad was good. The mussels I had were also good, with an excellent marinara.
But the star of the evening were the two small circles of filet mignon in the sandwich. They were cooked a perfect medium rare, seared outside, and as tender as can be inside. The meat was perfect.

Joey D’s Oak Room
1015 Crown Pointe Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30338
(770) 512-7063

Joey D's Oak Room on Urbanspoon

My mother-in-law is Japanese, my wife is half. Feeding a Japanese party the right way isn’t a hypothetical in my household, it’s a fact of life. To that end I’m better off when the restaurant is capable of serving the components of a formal Japanese meal, than I am with a sushi and ramen shack on steroids.



pork curry

Waraku Japanese Restaurant thus has a virtue most foodies and/or bloggers in Atlanta aren’t appreciative of, the idea that a full blown traditional Japanese dinner could be constructed from their menu. Waraku has an 8 page menu, and it’s not a collection of Decatur and Cobb County rolls. Instead, every major cooking technique in Shizuo Tsuji’s masterpiece “Japanese Cooking, a Simple Art” is represented. Grilled foods, pan fried foods, steamed foods, simmered foods, salads, noodle dishes, pickles are all here. Perhaps the only missing major component is nabemono, and nabemono requires such specialized staff to do right that very few restaurants try to do it anymore.

spicy squid circles

Japanese pepper kushiyaki

California roll bento box, with tonkatsu and vegetable tempura.

A good grilled mackerel can be had at Waraku.

The trendy folk will hang out at the Midtown sushi houses and the occasional ramen-ya, and try and convince themselves they’re seeing it all and know it all when it comes to Japanese food. Meanwhile, real Japanese, and a somewhat more modest population will find this place, recognize Waraku for the value it represents, and realize this is an inexpensive gem of an eatery on the edge of town.

custard after dinner

To note, this restaurant is not that easy to see from the street (it’s far back, in the same strip mall where Spiced Right is found) and the only sign that it is there are a few kanji and the word ‘Sushi’ by the street. So yes, get out Mapquest or Google Maps and locate this place. It’s not the easiest to see, but the quality of the food for the price you pay? Well worth it.

Waraku Japanese Restaurant
3131 Lawrenceville Suwanee Road
Suwanee, GA 30024
(678) 889-4188

Waraku Japanese Restaurant on Urbanspoon

PS – I want to thank my reader Coko for telling me about this place. If you have never read Coko, I’d strongly recommend reading her comment to this article.

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